Please Answer the Questions

Hungry, Happy, or Habitual?

Gut Theory’s Eater Type Survey

These questions aim to quantitatively assess participants’ eating behaviors related to hunger, satiation, satiety, emotional eating, eating pace, and physical sensations. Participants can be categorized based on their responses. These questions aim to deepen our understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity in distinct patients, to enable the creation of personalized recommendations.
1. How intense is your desire to eat before meals?

(1 is not intense and 5 is extremely intense)
2. Rate your hunger, level before breakfast.

(1 is not hungry at all and 5 is extremely hungry)
3. To what extent are visual cues or the smell of food influential in triggering your desire to eat?

(1 is not influential and 5 is extremely Influential)
4. How long does the feeling of fullness are typically last after a meal?

(1 is very short and 5 is very long)
5. Have you observed a correlation between hunger levels and specific times of the day?

(1 is no correlation and 5 is strong correlation)
6. To what extent do you use food to cope with stress or emotions?

(1 is rarely and 5 is frequently)
7. Rate the impact of emotions on your eating habits on a scale of 1 to 5.

(1 is no impact and 5 is high impact)
8. Have you noticed changes in appetite during periods of anxiety or depression?

(1 is rarely and 5 is frequently)
9. Do specific emotions trigger particular food cravings for you?

(1 is never and 5 is always)
10. How often do you eat in response to emotions?

(1 is rarely and 5 is frequently)
11. Describe your eating pace during meals:

(1 is fast and 5 slow)
12. How often do you stop eating when you feel satiated but not overly full?

(1 is rarely and 5 is always)
13. Have you intentionally slowed down your eating to savor flavors?

(1 is never and 5 is frequently)
14. Rate your awareness of satiety cues during a meal.

(1 is low awareness and 5 is high awareness)
15. How satisfied are you with smaller portions of food?

(1 is not satisfied and 5 is very satisfied)
16. Do you physically feel hungry as emptiness or growling in your stomach?

(1 is never and 5 is always)
17. How quickly do you feel the need to eat when you since hunger in your stomach?

(1 is very slowly and 5 is very quickly)
18. Is there a correlation between time elapsed since your last meal and intensity of stomach hunger?

(1 is no correlation and 5 is strong correlation)
19. How long does the feeling of fullness last after meal driven by stomach hunger?

(1 is very short and 5 is very long)
20. How important are physical hunger cues in determining when to eat compared to other factors?

(1 is not important and 5 is very important)
Hungry Brain
Hungry Brain
Abnormal satiation (sensation of fullness) is characterized by excessive calorie consumption to terminate a meal. Individuals in this category consume 62% more calories before reaching fullness.
Emotional Hunger
Emotional Hunger
Pleasure-seeking eating behavior associated with negative mood, emotional eating, cravings, and reward-seeking behaviors, despite maintaining normal homeostatic eating behavior. The emotional hunger group reported 2.8 times higher levels of anxiety.
Slow Burn
Slow Burn
Decreased metabolic rate characterized by reduced Resting Energy.  This means the body burns fewer calories when at rest. This group tends to have lower reported physical activity and exercise levels, and decreased muscle mass. The slow burn group had 12% lower predicted REE compared to other obesity groups.
Hungry Gut
Hungry Gut
Abnormal satiety (sensation of fullness) characterized by a reduced duration of fullness, objectively quantified by rapid gastric emptying. The hungry gut group emptied stomach contents 31% faster than other groups.
Hungry Brain
Abnormal satiation (sensation of fullness) is characterized by excessive calorie consumption to terminate a meal. Individuals in this category consume 62% more calories before reaching fullness.
Emotional Hunger
Pleasure-seeking eating behavior associated with negative mood, emotional eating, cravings, and reward-seeking behaviors, despite maintaining normal homeostatic eating behavior. The emotional hunger group reported 2.8 times higher levels of anxiety.
Slow Burn
Decreased metabolic rate characterized by reduced Resting Energy. This means the body burns fewer calories when at rest. This group tends to have lower reported physical activity and exercise levels, and decreased muscle mass. The slow burn group had 12% lower predicted REE compared to other obesity groups.
Hungry Gut
Abnormal satiety (sensation of fullness) characterized by a reduced duration of fullness, objectively quantified by rapid gastric emptying. The hungry gut group emptied stomach contents 31% faster than other groups.

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